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Licensing & Accreditation

Brookhaven Retreat is Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations and is licensed by the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

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beauty in life worth living

We are a private pay treatment center and do not accept any type of insurance. Costs associated with care are the responsibility of the client.

 

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Brookhaven Retreat Blog - For inspiration, growth & a fresh perspective.

A Girl and Her Father

A Girl and Her Father

Soup au Pistou

Soup au Pistou

Contemplation

Sore Throat Solutions

Can You Give Us A Twirl?

Broccolini Flounder Bake

The Reality of Sexual Assault

World Kindness Day

World Kindness Day

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

National Pomegranate Month

National Pomegranate Month

More Than Cute

Mental Health Wellness Week

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Addicted to Food

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Essential Kitchen Equipment: Back to the Basics

Adele and the Reality of Growing Older

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

What Is Self Care?

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Helping One Another

Helping One Another

Mental Illness Awareness

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unconditional Worth

Unconditional Worth

Empowering or Disheartening?

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Coping with Anger

Art in the News

Sweet Potato Salad

Sweet Potato Salad

Hurricane Prep

Hurricane Prep

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Alone Time

Chicken with Artichoke-Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

The Arms of Irony

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

The Necessity of Silence

The Necessity of Silence

Recovery

Recovery

Service with Style

Vietnamese Grilled Steak with Portobellos and Mint-Cilantro Mojo

Family Illness And The Dog

The Social Media Phenomenon

Top 10 Vegetarian Proteins

Know Who You Are

The Body and Soul - 5 Ways to Relax

Dr. Wayne Dyer Lives On

Toasted Ciabatta with Shrimp, Tarragon, and Arugula

Music—It’s More Than Noise

Gluten-Free Not Just for Celiac

A Hug is Worth A Thousand Words

Monday, 30 September 2013 02:02  by Mitzi B.

How often do you feel better after a hug from your mom or husband or child? If your day isn’t going just as planned, don’t you enjoy the moment when someone you know and love gives you a full-bodied hug?

Just the other night, my son came up to me out of the blue and gave me the best full-bodied, strong, squeezing hug. My response, while a bit surprised, was to squeeze back and tell him what a great hug that was! I felt so much better once he turned away. I realized I was smiling both outside and inside. Not only had I loved the impromptu encounter from my teenage son, but his affection had also left me with a feeling of warmth and quiet in my body.

Research gathered by Dr. Paul Zak shows that the human brain produces oxytocin, a neurotransmitter that acts like a hormone, and releases it in the body when we feel safe and secure. This chemical tells our brain that “everything is all right.” Dr. Zak has determined that the brain produces and releases the majority of this chemical during activities like breast-feeding, hugging, snuggling, holding hands, partner dancing, having bodywork and massage, and during prayer.

Physical touch can be so soothing to many and can even calm anxiety. When babies cry, don’t we pat them on the back to calm them down? And if someone is upset or depressed isn’t our first reaction to reach out and touch their shoulder or to hug them tight and say something about “things will be alright”? I know that whenever I visit relatives or friends, I consistently greet each member with a full hug and do the same when it is time to leave.

Dr. Zak’s determined that physical touch stimulates the most potent release of oxytocin. To further this research, Guastella and Colleagues conducted a study on volunteers and the role of oxytocin in recalling faces. Their research found that people who received boosts of oxytocin were more likely to remember and recall happy faces over angry or neutral facial expressions, thus lending to the “everything is all right” emotion that hugs can leave an individual feeling. Which honestly makes so much sense! Don’t you feel better encountering a smiling happy face then an angry or neutral expression? I certainly do.

So the next time someone says they feel “warm and fuzzy” inside, it could be the effects of a good hug they are truly feeling. So do yourself a favor whenever you are feeling low and unsure about a situation, and go hug someone! Dr. Zak prescribes at least eight hugs a day to feel happier and more content. Luckily, this is one prescription that is ok to become addicted to!

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