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National Poetry Month

Saturday, 09 April 2016 00:00  by Christina M.

Poetry month

Poetry has always given me a broader view of emotions and has served as a form of expression for me. Different syntax and structure give depth that other forms of literature don’t always reach. As someone who sometimes struggles to express moods and emotions, the poetic works of timeless and modern poets helps to expand my vocabulary on expression. Poets that have truly experienced the ups and downs of life and dove in to their emotions and perspectives and help me to be mindful and aware of the emotions I experience. Poetry can add perspective to struggles like grief and depression, and can help us to enjoy the positives by exploring the joys in everyday. From the love letters of John Keats, the introspective musings of Sylvia Plath, and the uplifting whimsy of Shel Silverstein poetry helps us look outside of ourselves and process the world around us. April 2016 marks the 20th anniversary of National Poetry Month. The first Poetry Month was celebrated in 1996 and hosted by the Academy of American Poets.

Take time to celebrate poetry this month, below are some tips and suggestions from the Academy of American Poets.

30 Ways to Celebrate National Poetry Month

  1. Order a free National Poetry Month poster and display it at work or school.
  2. Sign up for Poem-a-Day and read a poem each morning.
  3. Sign up for Teach This Poem, a weekly series for teachers.
  4. Memorize a poem.
  5. Create an anthology of your favorite poems on Poets.org.
  6. Encourage a young person to participate in the Dear Poet project.
  7. Buy a book of poetry from your local bookstore.
  8. Research how poetry matters in the United States today.
  9. Learn more about poets and poetry events in your state.
  10. Ask your governor or mayor for a proclamation in support of National Poetry Month.
  11. Attend a poetry reading at a local university, bookstore, cafe, or library.
  12. Read a poem at an open mic. It’s a great way to meet other writers in your area and find out about your local poetry writing community.
  13. Start a poetry reading group.
  14. Write a poem with friends.
  15. Chalk a poem on the sidewalk.
  16. Deepen your daily experience by reading Edward Hirsch’s essay “How to Read a Poem.”
  17. Ask the United States Post Office to issue more stamps celebrating poets.
  18. Recreate a poet’s favorite food or drink by following his or her recipe.
  19. Read about different poetic forms.
  20. Read about poems titled “poem.”
  21. Celebrate National Poem in Your Pocket Day on April 21, 2016. The idea is simple: select a poem you love, carry it with you, then share it with coworkers, family, and friends.
  22. Subscribe to American Poets magazine or a small press poetry journal.
  23. Watch Rachel Eliza Griffiths’s P.O.P (Poets on Poetry) videos.
  24. Watch or read Carolyn Forche’s talk “Not Persuasion, But Transport: The Poetry of Witness.”
  25. Read or listen to Mark Doty’s talk “Tide of Voices: Why Poetry Matters Now.”
  26. Read Allen Ginsberg’s classic essay about Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass.”
  27. Watch a poetry movie.
  28. Sign up for a poetry class or workshop.
  29. Get ready for Mother’s Day by making a card featuring a line of poetry.
  30. Read the first chapter of Muriel Rukeyer’s inspiring book The Life of Poetry.
Last modified on Saturday, 09 April 2016 05:58

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