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Our Apple Tree of Life – Part 3: Maturity and Fruitful Longevity

Wednesday, 11 May 2016 00:00  by Caitlin Y.

Appletree1

Recap: A little over a year ago, my family started to consider the idea of purchasing an apple tree. Prior to moving to Tennessee, we owned a small plot of land in Pennsylvania. It wasn’t enough for a large orchard (which I believe our family consumes about that many apples in a given year), but it would certainly be sufficient for an apple tree. We began to research and came to find that the process of planting an apple tree was much more complicated and involved than we had originally thought. I began to see many analogies between the life of an apple tree and humans. Here’s a glimpse into what I’ve found.

Once mature, the apple tree’s foundation may be significantly stronger and can withstand most elements that come against it, but there are still many obstacles for its delicate fruit to overcome. Pests and diseases are typical culprits that can ravage the fruit. There are various ways to protect the apple tree, which enables it to lead a prosperous life (about 100 years). However, if the tree is neglected it will stagnate.

There are many analogies that can be drawn from this, but I feel the main point is that both trees and humans alike need diligent care to be successful at bearing good “fruit” or being “fruitful.” That’s way too many puns for one sentence, but can you see the parallel of our needs? “Once an apple tree has filled in and is bearing fruit, it requires regular, moderate pruning.” I draw a correlation between this and our need as humans to “prune” the negativity of our lives so that the “good fruit” may flourish! Routine maintenance is necessary for optimum growth. We all have branches that need to be pruned or times we feel stagnant, but that doesn’t make us any less purposeful. I encourage you to embrace the stage you’re in and through it all, recognize your worth.

Last modified on Wednesday, 11 May 2016 04:44

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