gem

Admissions Concierge

Click Here for more information or to request a communication by phone, email or text.

Or Call

877-817-3422

We are here for you 24/7
Fast, confidential response

Licensing & Accreditation

Brookhaven Retreat is Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations and is licensed by the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

FIND OUT MORE

beauty in life worth living
beauty in life worth living

We are a private pay treatment center and do not accept any type of insurance. Costs associated with care are the responsibility of the client.

 

Create a Life Worth Living

 

Brookhaven Retreat Blog - For inspiration, growth & a fresh perspective.

A Girl and Her Father

A Girl and Her Father

Soup au Pistou

Soup au Pistou

Contemplation

Sore Throat Solutions

Can You Give Us A Twirl?

Broccolini Flounder Bake

The Reality of Sexual Assault

World Kindness Day

World Kindness Day

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

National Pomegranate Month

National Pomegranate Month

More Than Cute

Mental Health Wellness Week

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Addicted to Food

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Essential Kitchen Equipment: Back to the Basics

Adele and the Reality of Growing Older

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

What Is Self Care?

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Helping One Another

Helping One Another

Mental Illness Awareness

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unconditional Worth

Unconditional Worth

Empowering or Disheartening?

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Coping with Anger

Art in the News

Sweet Potato Salad

Sweet Potato Salad

Hurricane Prep

Hurricane Prep

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Alone Time

Chicken with Artichoke-Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

The Arms of Irony

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

The Necessity of Silence

The Necessity of Silence

Recovery

Recovery

Service with Style

Vietnamese Grilled Steak with Portobellos and Mint-Cilantro Mojo

Family Illness And The Dog

The Social Media Phenomenon

Top 10 Vegetarian Proteins

Know Who You Are

The Body and Soul - 5 Ways to Relax

Dr. Wayne Dyer Lives On

Toasted Ciabatta with Shrimp, Tarragon, and Arugula

Music—It’s More Than Noise

Gluten-Free Not Just for Celiac

Is Your Kitchen Full of Clutter?

Wednesday, 09 October 2013 20:54  by Jessica W.

There is something about kitchens that seems to attract clutter. They are the hearts of our homes, where we prepare the meals that nourish and sustain us and feed our friends and loved ones. They are at times gathering places, places of comfort and healing, places of creation and imagination. They feed more than our bodies but, in turn, seem to collect many of our things.

Over the years, both necessary and unnecessary objects collect here: extra rolling pins and vegetable peelers, cameras and purses, miscellaneous glasses or cutlery without partners. I pride myself in keeping a clean house, but I cleaned my kitchen this weekend, and there was a lot going into the donation boxes. Many of those things might sound familiar: a 20-year-old vegetable slicer, long replaced with food processor technology that’s been taking space in a cupboard for far too long; an outdated set of dishes that is never used; five teapots, all used, but all kept in different places; twenty coffee mugs, of which only six see frequent use; a ceramic jar from Provence, completely empty and kept only for decoration; a breadbox cluttered with everything but bread.

I parted with many of these things and faced my new cabinets with a rush of joy and excitement: all that space! Cleaning our kitchens of outdated or underused things allows us to keep only the very best and most useful equipment. It gives us a sense of pride and appreciation for beauty, makes us grateful for what we have, and encourages us to buy only the best to add to our beautiful space. De-cluttering provokes gratefulness and joy, among its many other mental health benefits.

There are many areas of our homes and lives exactly like this. Whether it is our bedrooms, closets or schedules, over cluttering prevents us from seeing the most important and most beautiful aspects of our lives. It also leads to stress and anxiety as we hassle with less than ideal situations simply because they are there.

Take the time to clean out your space, both mental and physical. Do this room by room and day by day, and the best and most beautiful parts of your life will fall into view. After all, if we cannot organize our spaces or our schedules, how can we make room for happiness?

Last modified on Wednesday, 09 October 2013 21:02
More in this category: « Homemade Nut Milk Sleep Tips for Fall »

Add comment


Blog Archive

It should be understood that any persons in pictures displayed on this page are models, and the pictures are used for illustrative purposes only.