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Licensing & Accreditation

Brookhaven Retreat is Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations and is licensed by the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

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beauty in life worth living
beauty in life worth living

We are a private pay treatment center and do not accept any type of insurance. Costs associated with care are the responsibility of the client.

 

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Brookhaven Retreat Blog - For inspiration, growth & a fresh perspective.

A Girl and Her Father

A Girl and Her Father

Soup au Pistou

Soup au Pistou

Contemplation

Sore Throat Solutions

Can You Give Us A Twirl?

Broccolini Flounder Bake

The Reality of Sexual Assault

World Kindness Day

World Kindness Day

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

National Pomegranate Month

National Pomegranate Month

More Than Cute

Mental Health Wellness Week

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Addicted to Food

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Essential Kitchen Equipment: Back to the Basics

Adele and the Reality of Growing Older

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

What Is Self Care?

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Helping One Another

Helping One Another

Mental Illness Awareness

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unconditional Worth

Unconditional Worth

Empowering or Disheartening?

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Coping with Anger

Art in the News

Sweet Potato Salad

Sweet Potato Salad

Hurricane Prep

Hurricane Prep

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Alone Time

Chicken with Artichoke-Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

The Arms of Irony

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

The Necessity of Silence

The Necessity of Silence

Recovery

Recovery

Service with Style

Vietnamese Grilled Steak with Portobellos and Mint-Cilantro Mojo

Family Illness And The Dog

The Social Media Phenomenon

Top 10 Vegetarian Proteins

Know Who You Are

The Body and Soul - 5 Ways to Relax

Dr. Wayne Dyer Lives On

Toasted Ciabatta with Shrimp, Tarragon, and Arugula

Music—It’s More Than Noise

Gluten-Free Not Just for Celiac

Urban Nature

Thursday, 10 April 2014 23:48  by Emily S.

April is in full motion; the trees are blooming and it is quickly starting to feel like spring! Festivals dedicated to the beautiful flowering dogwoods and cherry blossom trees kick off outdoor events for the rest of the year. Surrounded by thousands of people at the Dogwood Arts Festival in Knoxville, Tennessee, it registered to me that blossoming trees and nature bring people together.

Nature undoubtedly has a calming effect on people. Getting away from the city shuffle, enjoying the sound of birds chirping, creeks trickling and wind blowing generates inner stillness. But what about a city center full of people laughing and music playing, busy and bustling areas that can still bring forth calmness? How can we reduce our stress while still inside a hectic, urbanized city? Greenery.

A study conducted by a group at the University of Illinois gathered that adults in the inner city migrated to outdoor areas with trees, drawing people out of their homes and interacting with neighbors and their community. The study also showed that people felt safer in areas with a lot of trees, contrary to what city developers often thought. A large-scale Dutch study concluded that college students who had a view of living plants showed higher cognitive function, better impulse control and conflict management.

Parks and urban green space lower stress and improve overall mental health. In the UK, a major study showed that people are happier when they live in a greener neighborhood regardless of social factors like marriage, income, home or health.

If you look at the “happiest and healthiest cities” in the United States, each city has low obesity rates, abundant outdoor greenery and city gardens. Research also shows that these mental health benefits are not short lived. They are immediate and long lasting.

From the Washington D.C. Cherry Blossom Festival to my little city’s Dogwood Arts Festival, most metropolitan areas are beginning to understand the importance of green space in an urban environment. It helps to improve mental health, social participation and physical activity. Planting trees and greenery throughout neighborhoods can decrease criminal activity, build a stronger community and provide an escape from stress and depression, supporting an overall happier life. Plus, with most of the events being free or low cost, it is easy to get involved in the community activities and boost our mental health!

Last modified on Friday, 11 April 2014 00:36
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