gem

Admissions Concierge

Click Here for more information or to request a communication by phone, email or text.

Or Call

877-817-3422

We are here for you 24/7
Fast, confidential response

Licensing & Accreditation

Brookhaven Retreat is Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations and is licensed by the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

FIND OUT MORE

beauty in life worth living
beauty in life worth living

We are a private pay treatment center and do not accept any type of insurance. Costs associated with care are the responsibility of the client.

 

Create a Life Worth Living

 

Brookhaven Retreat Blog - For inspiration, growth & a fresh perspective.

A Girl and Her Father

A Girl and Her Father

Soup au Pistou

Soup au Pistou

Contemplation

Sore Throat Solutions

Can You Give Us A Twirl?

Broccolini Flounder Bake

The Reality of Sexual Assault

World Kindness Day

World Kindness Day

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

National Pomegranate Month

National Pomegranate Month

More Than Cute

Mental Health Wellness Week

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Addicted to Food

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Essential Kitchen Equipment: Back to the Basics

Adele and the Reality of Growing Older

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

What Is Self Care?

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Helping One Another

Helping One Another

Mental Illness Awareness

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unconditional Worth

Unconditional Worth

Empowering or Disheartening?

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Coping with Anger

Art in the News

Sweet Potato Salad

Sweet Potato Salad

Hurricane Prep

Hurricane Prep

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Alone Time

Chicken with Artichoke-Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

The Arms of Irony

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

The Necessity of Silence

The Necessity of Silence

Recovery

Recovery

Service with Style

Vietnamese Grilled Steak with Portobellos and Mint-Cilantro Mojo

Family Illness And The Dog

The Social Media Phenomenon

Top 10 Vegetarian Proteins

Know Who You Are

The Body and Soul - 5 Ways to Relax

Dr. Wayne Dyer Lives On

Toasted Ciabatta with Shrimp, Tarragon, and Arugula

Music—It’s More Than Noise

Gluten-Free Not Just for Celiac

Art Is Therapy

Thursday, 16 October 2014 00:00  by Erin L.

Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954) was a strong woman and a Mexican painter who is best known for her self-portraits. The artist struggled with depression and was hospitalized often throughout her life due to poor health. The pain was very intense and it often left her confined to a hospital or bedridden for months. Kahlo shared her physical challenges through her art and once said, "I paint myself because I am so often alone and because I am the subject I know best."

Frida Kahlo began painting herself after she was severely injured in a bus accident in 1925. Kahlo was traveling on a bus when the vehicle collided with a streetcar. As a result of the collision, Kahlo was impaled by a steel handrail, which went into her hip and came out the other side. She suffered several serious injuries as a result, including fractures in her spine and pelvis. Although, she recovered from her injuries and eventually regained her ability to walk, she had relapses of extreme pain for the remainder of her life. Recovering from her injuries isolated her from other people, and this isolation influenced her works, many of which are self-portraits of one sort or another. She began painting during her recovery and finished her first self-portrait the following year. She began with paints lent to her by her father and an easel specially made for her by order of her mother that allowed her to paint in bed.

Before the accident, in 1922, the famed Mexican muralist Diego Rivera went to work on a project at her school. Kahlo often watched as Rivera created a mural in the school’s lecture hall. The two became acquainted, then, and their lives and artwork were to become intertwined. Kahlo reconnected with Rivera in 1928. He encouraged her artwork, and the two began a relationship. The couple married the following year. That marriage was riddled with misfortune as well as love.

In one painting, titled Henry Ford Hospital (1932), Kahlo painted herself on a hospital bed with several things: a fetus, a snail, a flower, a pelvis and others. These items are displayed floating around her image and connected to her by red strings resembling veins. Just like her earlier self-portraits, this painting was extremely personal. It tells the story of her second miscarriage in a very long line of them to come.

She had many major exhibitions, all over the world, selling many paintings in the process, and also received several commissions throughout her career. Kahlo went to live in Paris for a time where she exhibited some of her paintings and developed friendships such artists as Marcel Duchamp and Pablo Picasso. She divorced Rivera later that year. Instead of letting the divorce break her down, she put her energy into painting one of her most famous works: The Two Fridas (1939). This painting shows two versions of the artist sitting next to each other. Both of their hearts are exposed. The first Frida is dressed in mostly all white and has a damaged heart with spots of blood on her clothing. The second Frida is wearing bold colored clothes. Her heart is intact. It is believed that these two figures represent the “unloved” and “loved” versions of Ms. Kahlo. A couple of years later, she received a commission from the Mexican government for five portraits of important Mexican women. Despite challenges in her personal life, she consistently continued to pour herself into her art. As a result, her paintings grew in popularity and she was included in an infinite number of group shows around this time.

She had many surgeries and wore special corsets to try to fix her back. She would continue to seek a variety of treatments for her chronic physical pain with little success. Her father passed away. Her love life was chaotic and troublesome. Her health issues became nearly all consuming in 1950. After being diagnosed with gangrene in her right foot, Kahlo spent nine months in the hospital and had several operations during this time. All the while, she continued to paint. All the while, art was her therapy.

In the last year of her life, Kahlo received her first solo exhibition in Mexico. She was bedridden at the time, but this did not stop her from attending the exhibition’s opening. Arriving by ambulance, Kahlo spent the evening talking and celebrating with those who came out for the show from the comfort of a four-poster bed set up in the gallery just for her. A few months later, part of her right leg was amputated to stop the spread of gangrene. She prevailed and inspired until her last breathe.

Years after her death, the feminist movement of the 1970s began to renew faded interest in her life and work. Even today, Frida is viewed by many as a female icon in the realm of creativity and self-expression. Her work has been celebrated, especially, in Mexico as an emblem of national and native tradition. There too, feminists admire her work for its representation of the female experience and form without compromise.

Last modified on Thursday, 16 October 2014 06:08
More in this category: « Nutrition By Color Embarrassment: The Ubiquitous Emotion »

Add comment


Blog Archive

It should be understood that any persons in pictures displayed on this page are models, and the pictures are used for illustrative purposes only.