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Licensing & Accreditation

Brookhaven Retreat is Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations and is licensed by the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

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We are a private pay treatment center and do not accept any type of insurance. Costs associated with care are the responsibility of the client.

 

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Brookhaven Retreat Blog - For inspiration, growth & a fresh perspective.

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A Girl and Her Father

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How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

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National Pomegranate Month

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Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

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Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

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Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

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Black Lentil Beet Salad

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Helping One Another

Helping One Another

Mental Illness Awareness

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unconditional Worth

Unconditional Worth

Empowering or Disheartening?

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

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Art in the News

Sweet Potato Salad

Sweet Potato Salad

Hurricane Prep

Hurricane Prep

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

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Chicken with Artichoke-Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

The Arms of Irony

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

The Necessity of Silence

The Necessity of Silence

Recovery

Recovery

Service with Style

Vietnamese Grilled Steak with Portobellos and Mint-Cilantro Mojo

Family Illness And The Dog

The Social Media Phenomenon

Top 10 Vegetarian Proteins

Know Who You Are

The Body and Soul - 5 Ways to Relax

Dr. Wayne Dyer Lives On

Toasted Ciabatta with Shrimp, Tarragon, and Arugula

Music—It’s More Than Noise

Gluten-Free Not Just for Celiac

What You Might Not Know About Cows And Emotional Health

Friday, 07 November 2014 00:00  by Gena P.

Look at these two words, “cow” and “depression”. These words are typically not put together. “Why would a cow be depressed,” you might ask. Here in East Tennessee, I pass many peaceful pastures and vast open land while simply driving to Brookhaven Retreat, and well, the cows just stand or lie there. They eat grass and you might see one move, occasionally.

Over the years there have been many published studies through BBC News, Time Magazine and One Green Planet that explain how cows are uniquely like people when it comes to their emotional needs. First of all, cows prefer to be called by their given names. Many farmers name each of their cows. In the case that you do not have her name, give her one and each time you run into her please address her as so. Studies have proven that calling cows by their name (yes, they do recognize their own names) and personal touch make for healthier and happier animals thus yielding more milk. She will remember you after a time or two. So apparently, elephants are not the only ones who “never forget” and if you choose to be mean to her then she’s likely to hold a grudge for a long time.

Like humans, cows have emotional needs. They love to give kisses (yikes!), love to be petted, cry for lost calves, go through bereavement when a member of their herd passes, and form “cliques” - often choosing a small circle of 2-4 other cows. They get excited and are often found prancing about to express their joy especially after a long hard winter when they have been housed in a barn. Studies also indicate cows definitely prefer country (pasture) living to the city (industrial operations). The results are again found in increased productivity and a healthier product.

Cows are extremely social, and according to an animal science study done by the University of British Columbia, if a cow is by herself, it is more than likely one of two things; she is either unwell or about to give birth. So if you see “Bessie” off to herself, you might wander over to check on her.

Remember, the next time you pass a cow, say “hello”. You could be saying “hi” to the best friend you will ever have.

Last modified on Friday, 07 November 2014 05:31
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