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Brookhaven Retreat is Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations and is licensed by the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

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We are a private pay treatment center and do not accept any type of insurance. Costs associated with care are the responsibility of the client.

 

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Brookhaven Retreat Blog - For inspiration, growth & a fresh perspective.

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A Girl and Her Father

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World Kindness Day

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National Pomegranate Month

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Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

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Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

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Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

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Black Lentil Beet Salad

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Helping One Another

Helping One Another

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Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unconditional Worth

Unconditional Worth

Empowering or Disheartening?

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Coping with Anger

Art in the News

Sweet Potato Salad

Sweet Potato Salad

Hurricane Prep

Hurricane Prep

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

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Chicken with Artichoke-Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

The Arms of Irony

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

The Necessity of Silence

The Necessity of Silence

Recovery

Recovery

Service with Style

Vietnamese Grilled Steak with Portobellos and Mint-Cilantro Mojo

Family Illness And The Dog

The Social Media Phenomenon

Top 10 Vegetarian Proteins

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The Body and Soul - 5 Ways to Relax

Dr. Wayne Dyer Lives On

Toasted Ciabatta with Shrimp, Tarragon, and Arugula

Music—It’s More Than Noise

Random Acts of Kindness

Friday, 28 November 2014 00:00  by Lori R.

Did you ever see a person in the car next to you on the road and wonder where they are headed? What is their life like? What are their joys and sufferings? There are a lot of people out there who could benefit from a kind word or deed. The concept of “random acts of kindness” is not new. The quote “Practice random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty” originated in 1982 when Anne Herbert wrote it on a placemat in a California restaurant. But the act of being kind to others has been present in every culture since the beginning of recorded history. Even the smallest good deed can make someone’s day and restore their faith in mankind when they have suffered disappointments and failures from others.

What can I do? I’m just one person, you may say. There are dozens of opportunities to bring out a smile in even the most depressed person. You may find that brightening someone’s day actually brightens your own as well; lifting symptoms of anxiety, depression, and other commonly suffered mood disorders. Berkeley University published results of several studies showing that kindness can lower blood pressure, reduce stress, increase life expectancy and increase endorphin production, all of which improve our physical and emotional health.

Try these small acts of kindness for a start:

  • Send a real letter in the mail. In this age of technology, a hand-written note in the mailbox is a thoughtful reminder that you care.
  • Pay an unexpected compliment. Find something positive to point out in everyone you meet.
  • Listen with eye contact. Give someone your undivided attention with no time constraint.
  • Talk to people in general. Ask a cashier how their day is going and tell them you hope their shift is a good one, or empathize with someone in a waiting room.
  • Help someone find answers. If a friend is diagnosed with PTSD, print off some helpful information from the web.
  • Use the power of post-its. Leave post-it notes randomly and often for friends, family and co-workers with a well wish or happy thought.
  • For a greater time commitment to “not so random” acts of kindness, join a volunteer group and visit seniors in a nursing home, deliver meals on wheels to shut-ins, or bring necessities to the homeless.

Even just a smile goes a long way!

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