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Licensing & Accreditation

Brookhaven Retreat is Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations and is licensed by the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

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beauty in life worth living
beauty in life worth living

We are a private pay treatment center and do not accept any type of insurance. Costs associated with care are the responsibility of the client.

 

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Brookhaven Retreat Blog - For inspiration, growth & a fresh perspective.

A Girl and Her Father

A Girl and Her Father

Soup au Pistou

Soup au Pistou

Contemplation

Sore Throat Solutions

Can You Give Us A Twirl?

Broccolini Flounder Bake

The Reality of Sexual Assault

World Kindness Day

World Kindness Day

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

How to Stock Your Pantry: The Essentials

National Pomegranate Month

National Pomegranate Month

More Than Cute

Mental Health Wellness Week

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Pineapple Chicken Stir-Fry with Black Bean Sauce

Addicted to Food

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Taylor Swift and Anxiety

Essential Kitchen Equipment: Back to the Basics

Adele and the Reality of Growing Older

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

Maureen O’Hara—A Legacy

What Is Self Care?

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Black Lentil Beet Salad

Helping One Another

Helping One Another

Mental Illness Awareness

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Women, You ARE Beautiful!

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unconditional Worth

Unconditional Worth

Empowering or Disheartening?

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Pappardelle with Roasted Winter Squash, Arugula, and Pine Nuts

Coping with Anger

Art in the News

Sweet Potato Salad

Sweet Potato Salad

Hurricane Prep

Hurricane Prep

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Fashion Trends: The Knit Cap

Alone Time

Chicken with Artichoke-Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto

The Arms of Irony

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Focus the Mind, Reap the Rewards

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

The Necessity of Silence

The Necessity of Silence

Recovery

Recovery

Service with Style

Vietnamese Grilled Steak with Portobellos and Mint-Cilantro Mojo

Family Illness And The Dog

The Social Media Phenomenon

Top 10 Vegetarian Proteins

Know Who You Are

The Body and Soul - 5 Ways to Relax

Dr. Wayne Dyer Lives On

Toasted Ciabatta with Shrimp, Tarragon, and Arugula

Music—It’s More Than Noise

Gluten-Free Not Just for Celiac

Tips For Choosing The Healthiest Produce

Monday, 10 February 2014 22:17  by Charity B.

Carrots

“Baby” carrots are made by whittling away the outer layer of the vegetable, the healthiest part of the root. Try buying full-sized carrots with their tops still attached. Fresh carrots have the highest beta-carotene content, which is converted in the body to vitamin A. Vitamin A is important for eye health as well as for strong, healthy hair. However, fresh carrots can be difficult for some people to digest, so try minimally cooked carrots for better beta-carotene absorption.

Kale

Just one serving of this super green food has more calcium than six ounces of milk and more fiber than three slices of whole wheat bread. So if you’re going vegan and/or gluten-free this is a great option. Kale is considered to be one of the healthiest foods you could put in your body due to its high vitamin, mineral and phytochemical content. Try red-leafed varieties such as Red Russian, which contain higher levels of antioxidants.

Cherries

Try Bing cherries, one of the healthiest varieties due to their anthocyanin content. These are antioxidants that give the cherries their pigment, as well as their inflammation and cancer-fighting properties. For the best cherries look at the stem rather than the fruit—bright-greens stems indicate a fresh cherry.

Watermelon

Likes tomatoes, watermelon is packed with the phytonutrient lycopene. Melons with dark red flesh indicate higher levels of this beneficial nutrient. Lycopene helps protect the body’s cells from oxidative damage. It also contains the amino acid citrulline, which the kidneys convert to arginine. Higher levels of arginine increase blood flow and decrease fat accumulation in the cells, and thus improve cardiovascular health.

Beets

Look for dark red beets to get the highest levels of betalaines. These are cancer-fighting compounds that give the plant it’s rich color. These compounds have been shown to provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification support to the body. Unlike some other food pigments, betalains undergo very steady loss from food as the length of cooking time is increased. In fact, the red betalain pigments in beets are far less heat stable than red anthocyanin pigments in red cabbage. Try juicing beets to receive the nutritional benefits without the heat damage.

Peaches

Peaches have a great variety of nutrients, including vitamin C And A, fiber, potassium, lycopene and lutein and more. Usually the darker the fruit or vegetable the higher the nutrient content. However, with peaches the white-fleshed varieties have up to six times more antioxidants than the yellow-fleshed varieties. For the best peaches, purchase them during their peak season from May to September and choose ones with a rosy blush that have a slight give to them when pressed.

Last modified on Monday, 10 February 2014 22:23
More in this category: « It’s About the Journey Saying Bye-Bye to the Monday Blues . . . »

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